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Bringing Stormwater Management to Towson University

Ecotone is assisting Towson University (TU) complete rehabilitation construction and retrofitting for 7 stormwater conveyance and best management practice (BMP) facilities located throughout the university campus. Ecotone completed retrofitting of bioretention facilities associated with Unitas Stadium and the Towsontown Parking Garage. This included complete removal of sediment and replacement of deteriorated drainage components, installation of gabion stone matress’ to increase the conveyance of stormwater for better bioretention , and installation of new bioretention soil, sand, and gravel layers to ensure optimal performance of the facilities now and in the future. Ecotone finished the sites in close coordination with the contracted design team and University construction and landscape specialists to ensure the final product was an effective stormwater treatment systems that also met the landscaping and aesthetic standards of the University. “Ecotone has been a reliable and responsible partner in helping Towson University restore and replace aging stormwater facilities and structures.” stated Rance Burger, Towson University Construction Manager.

Not only are we retrofitting existing Bioretention facilities, we are also replacing damaged/outdated stormwater conveyance infrastructure with new systems meeting modern standards. This includes the complete replacement of an endwall and heavily damaged concrete surface conveyance channel with a subsurface piping and manholes for better conveyance at the intersection of Osler and Cross Campus Drives. Ecotone has the in-house know-how and resources to be a one stop shop for all stormwater management upgrade needs.
 
”These stormwater management systems feed the streams we restore and it is just as important to improve existing stormwater infrastructure as it is to restore the streams themselves.  These retrofitting projects reduce the sediment and pollutants entering the streams we restore and help to increase the ecological uplift achieved in downstream ecosystems, including the Chesapeake Bay. Having the in-house expertise to assist clients do both is very rewarding,” said Mark Magness, Project Manager at Ecotone

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